1 day ago with 30 notes
soleildemidi:


Photography by Andrea Zampatti @ wildlites.it
The Hazel Dormouse or Common Dormouse (Muscardinus avellanarius) is a small mammal and the only living species in the genus Muscardinus. It is 6 to 9 centimetres (2.4 to 3.5 in) long with a tail of 5.7 to 7.5 centimetres (2.2 to 3.0 in). It weighs 17 to 20 grams (0.60 to 0.71 oz), although this increases to 30 to 40 grams (1.1 to 1.4 oz) just before hibernation. The Hazel Dormouse hibernates from October to April-May. The Hazel Dormouse is native to northern Europe and Asia Minor. It is the only dormouse native to the British Isles, and is therefore often referred to simply as the Dormouse in British sources.

soleildemidi:

Photography by Andrea Zampatti @ wildlites.it

The Hazel Dormouse or Common Dormouse (Muscardinus avellanarius) is a small mammal and the only living species in the genus Muscardinus. It is 6 to 9 centimetres (2.4 to 3.5 in) long with a tail of 5.7 to 7.5 centimetres (2.2 to 3.0 in). It weighs 17 to 20 grams (0.60 to 0.71 oz), although this increases to 30 to 40 grams (1.1 to 1.4 oz) just before hibernation. The Hazel Dormouse hibernates from October to April-May. The Hazel Dormouse is native to northern Europe and Asia Minor. It is the only dormouse native to the British Isles, and is therefore often referred to simply as the Dormouse in British sources.





3 days ago with 631 notes
via fyeahcows,
fyeahcows:

Highland Cow by Grant Glendinning on Flickr.

fyeahcows:

Highland Cow by Grant Glendinning on Flickr.





4 days ago with 46 notes
via maiwyn,

by Wildlife Online

European Badger

by Wildlife Online

European Badger





5 days ago with 212 notes
fairy-wren:

Whooper Swan and Mallard Ducks. Photo by 100damateur

fairy-wren:

Whooper Swan and Mallard Ducks. Photo by 100damateur





6 days ago with 301 notes
beautiful-wildlife:

Peekaboo by Yolanda van der Wal

Pine Marten

beautiful-wildlife:

Peekaboo by Yolanda van der Wal

Pine Marten





1 week ago with 1,552 notes
headlikeanorange:

Dunnock in the rain (He still hasn’t found it.)

headlikeanorange:

Dunnock in the rain (He still hasn’t found it.)





1 week ago with 147 notes
howtoskinatiger:

My Wildlife by Rivertracker on Flickr.

Jackdaw

howtoskinatiger:

My Wildlife by Rivertracker on Flickr.

Jackdaw





1 week ago with 11 notes
fortheloveofbritishbirds:

Robin
Erithacus rubecula
The UK’s favourite bird - with its bright red breast it is familar throughout the year and especially at Christmas! Males and females look identical, and young birds have no red breast and are spotted with golden brown. The Robin is diurnal, although has been reported to be active hunting insects on moonlit nights or singing near artificial light.
Well known to British and Irish gardeners, it is relatively unafraid of people and likes to come close when anyone is digging the soil, in order to look out for earthworms and other food freshly turned up. Indeed, the Robin is considered to be a gardener’s friend.
Robins can be see all year round across the UK in woodland, hedgerows, parks and gardens.
Source: http://www.rspb.org.uk/wildlife/birdguide/name/r/robin/index.aspx, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_Robin
Conservation Status: Green.

fortheloveofbritishbirds:

Robin

Erithacus rubecula

The UK’s favourite bird - with its bright red breast it is familar throughout the year and especially at Christmas! Males and females look identical, and young birds have no red breast and are spotted with golden brown. The Robin is diurnal, although has been reported to be active hunting insects on moonlit nights or singing near artificial light.

Well known to British and Irish gardeners, it is relatively unafraid of people and likes to come close when anyone is digging the soil, in order to look out for earthworms and other food freshly turned up. Indeed, the Robin is considered to be a gardener’s friend.

Robins can be see all year round across the UK in woodland, hedgerows, parks and gardens.

Source: http://www.rspb.org.uk/wildlife/birdguide/name/r/robin/index.aspx
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_Robin

Conservation Status: Green.





1 week ago with 5 notes
Red Squirrel

Red Squirrel





1 week ago with 22 notes
mtrtenebrarum:

Diving Kingfisher

mtrtenebrarum:

Diving Kingfisher





1 week ago with 231 notes
thingswithantlers:

By mikejrae

Roe Deer

thingswithantlers:

By mikejrae

Roe Deer

#roe deer




1 week ago with 10 notes
echoesofmine:

chunkeh.

Grey Seal

echoesofmine:

chunkeh.

Grey Seal





1 week ago with 32 notes

fortheloveofbritishbirds:

serialfrenchies:

A very distinctive goldfinch. #anotherboringbirdtweet

This is the second time I’ve seen this visitor. The first time I didn’t get a good look at him and I thought I’d imagined his mutation. Clearly his top and bottom beak are misaligned and can’t wear down with use, like can happen with a rabbit’s teeth, and he’s obviously snapped off the top beak.

His condition is fine though and he obviously feeds with little problem; in fact his extra reach gave him an advantage first thing this morning before I’d filled the feeders as you can see from the last photo.

Absolutely fascinating and lovely to see that the bird is getting along just fine! :) 





1 week ago with 12 notes
fortheloveofbritishbirds:

NIGHTJAR
Caprimulgus europaeus@http://jmrabby.oiseaux.net/european.nightjar.3.html
Nightjars are nocturnal birds and can be seen hawking for food at dusk and dawn. With pointed wings and a long tails their shape is similar to a Kestrel or Cuckoo. Their cryptic, grey-brown, mottled, streaked and barred plumage provides ideal camouflage in the daytime. They have an almost supernatural reputation with their silent flight and their mythical ability to steal milk from goats. The first indication that a Nightjar is near is usually the male’s churring song, rising and falling with a ventriloquial quality.
Nightjars are found on heathlands, moorlands, in open woodland with clearings, and in recently felled conifer plantations. Most numerous in southern England with good numbers in the New Forest, Dorset and Surrey heathlands, and Thetford forest in Suffolk. Also found in parts of Wales, northern England and SW Scotland. RSPB reserves with nightjars are: Arne, Dorset; Aylesbeare, Devon; and Minsmere and North Warren, Suffolk.
Source: http://www.rspb.org.uk/wildlife/birdguide/name/n/nightjar/index.aspx
Conservation Status: Red.

fortheloveofbritishbirds:

NIGHTJAR

Caprimulgus europaeus
@http://jmrabby.oiseaux.net/european.nightjar.3.html

Nightjars are nocturnal birds and can be seen hawking for food at dusk and dawn. With pointed wings and a long tails their shape is similar to a Kestrel or Cuckoo. Their cryptic, grey-brown, mottled, streaked and barred plumage provides ideal camouflage in the daytime. They have an almost supernatural reputation with their silent flight and their mythical ability to steal milk from goats. The first indication that a Nightjar is near is usually the male’s churring song, rising and falling with a ventriloquial quality.

Nightjars are found on heathlands, moorlands, in open woodland with clearings, and in recently felled conifer plantations. Most numerous in southern England with good numbers in the New Forest, Dorset and Surrey heathlands, and Thetford forest in Suffolk. Also found in parts of Wales, northern England and SW Scotland. RSPB reserves with nightjars are: Arne, Dorset; Aylesbeare, Devon; and Minsmere and North Warren, Suffolk.

Source: http://www.rspb.org.uk/wildlife/birdguide/name/n/nightjar/index.aspx

Conservation Status: Red.





2 weeks ago with 508 notes
via cloudyowl,
cloudyowl:

Tawny Owl by Robin Lowry

cloudyowl:

Tawny Owl by Robin Lowry